Honors English Nine: Final Exam Study Guide

 

Test Sections:

1) Literary Analysis

New Short Story with Objective Multiple Choice Questions

2) Critical Reading of Non-Fiction

Reading Analysis of Passage with Objective Multiple Choice Questions

English Grammar Analysis Passage with Multiple Choice Questions

3) One-Paragraph Essay (Two Possible Writing Prompts)

 

Required Literature from Semester One Freshman Year:

Genre: Novel

Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird Online Version (Option One Option Two)
Jem, Scout, Atticus, Dill, Tom
Robinson, Calpurnia, Boo Radley, Miss Maudie, Bob
Ewell, Mrs. Dubose, Mayella Ewell, Walter Cunningham

Genre: "Short Story"

Eugenia Collier - “Marigolds” (online version)
Lizabeth, Miss Lottie, John Burke

Richard Connell - “The Most Dangerous Game” (online version)
Rainsford, Whitney, Zaroff

James Hurst - “The Scarlet Ibis” (online version)
Doodle, Brother

Shirley Jackson - “The Lottery” (online version)
Old Man Warner, Tessie Hutchinson,
Bill Hutchinson, Mr. Summers

Saki - “The Interlopers” (online version)
Georg Znaeym, Ulrich von Gradwitz

William Stafford - "The Osage Orange Tree" (online version)
The Narrator, Evangeline, Jane Wright

Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. - “Harrison Bergeron” (online version)
Harrison, George, Hazel, Diana Moon-Glompers, ballerina

Handout on Responding to Essay Questions (Hard Copy)

Helpful Hints for Writing Response (the Assessment Rubric)

Focus:

1. Read the question carefully and answer it carefully with insightful analysis.
2. Write a topic sentence that reflects a clear understanding of the prompt and addresses the prompt.
3. Stay on topic.
4. Remember your audience and write for it. Consider your audience high school freshmen and their teachers.

1. Make your topic sentence clear, as well as your conclusion within the paragraph.
2. Within the one-paragraph structure, develop a sophisticated pattern of organization of ideas.
3. Skillfully utilize transitions.

Organization:

1. Make your topic sentence clear, as well as your conclusion within the paragraph.
2. Within the one-paragraph structure, develop a sophisticated pattern of organization of ideas.
3. Skillfully utilize transitions.

Content (Support/Elaboration):

1. Avoid summary and listing as forms of support.
2. Instead, use insightful discussion to prove the relationship between examples and your main idea.
3. Integrate this support smoothly.
4. Use the BEST examples you can think of in your paragraph

Usage/Mechanics:

1. Write in third person (he/she/it/they), NOT first person (I, me, we, us, mine, our) or second person (you, your).
2. Use present tense verbs for literature.
3. Avoid “there is” and “there are.”
4. Put periods and commas inside quotation marks.
5. Make the pronoun and antecedent agree: Everyone brought his/her book to class.
NOT: Everyone brought their book to class.
6. “A lot” is a place to park cars; “alot” isn’t even a word. Avoid both.
7. Be sure to use commas correctly.

Style:

1. Use vivid verbs.
2. Avoid passive voice.
3. Vary your sentence beginnings.
4. Vary your sentence lengths and types.
5. Add some pizzazz that lets us hear YOU. Yes, this essay has a formula, but you can be creative and add your voice even with the structure. :-)

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