AP Language:  Manuscript Speech Delivery and Rhetorical Analysis

 

Step 1: 
Choose a partner to collaborate with on this activity. Select a speech by a reputable speaker that was originally delivered in a formal setting (see links below).  Examples include presidential or other political or historical speeches, college commencement speeches, speeches delivered to promote social change, a Nobel Prize Winner’s lecture, a famous sermon or eulogy.  Submit a copy of a speech for approval (provide a link to the speech). Speeches must be a minimum of 4 minutes in length and each person must deliver a minimum of TWO minutes of continuous content. For longer speeches, you will work together to create a 4 - 6 minute cutting, being careful to preserve the integrity of the speech.

SPEECHES WILL BE APPROVED ON A FIRST COME, FIRST SUBMITTED BASIS. ALL SPEECHES MUST BE APPROVED BY ELECTION DAY: TUESDAY NOVEMBER 8TH

Google SPEECH Form Submission Links (be sure you submit into the proper hour - one submission per pair)

2nd Hour LINK

4th Hour LINK

5th Hour LINK

SPEECHES WILL BE DELIVERED BETWEEN NOVEMBER 15th - NOVEMBER 22nd

 

Step 2: 
Once you and your partner have a speech selected and it has been approved, read it several times and write a SOAPSTone summary (see sample) and complete a rhetorical analysis of the strategies, devices and modes in your shared Google doc using Google Classroom.  Once you and your partner have familiarized yourselves with the whole piece, read it aloud to time it (decide who will do the "first half" and who will do the "second half" of the speech. DO NOT alternate smaller sections! Each person must deliver a minimum of TWO minutes of continuous content.  IF NECESSARY, work together to create a 4 - 6 minute cutting, being careful to preserve the integrity of the speech.  In your shared document, copy the original speech and then begin to "cut" if necessary. If the original speech does not last at least four minutes, then you must select a different speech.

 

 

Step 3: 
Read the cutting you have selected out loud four times. Working in your Google doc highlight places where you hear a natural pause (then print out your “cut version,” take a pencil and mark vertical lines where you hear a natural pause). Underline key words you want to emphasize. Choose parts to present more slowly and parts where you will speed up for emphasis. Determine where the climax of the speech is so you can build an arc into your presentation. In your Google doc, below your “cut speech” reflect on the speaker's reliance on ethos, logos and pathos. Note particular parts that illustrate each appeal. Make a pie chart conveying how much of the speech relies on the three appeals.

Step 4: 
In your Google doc, further analyze the occasion and audience and consider what language choices and elements of the speaker's approach have to do with that audience and occasion.  You may need to do some informal research to do this. Write an introduction to the speech that you will present to the class.  Begin with a brief attention grabber, and then include any explanation needed to prepare your audience to understand your cutting and the original context in which the speaker delivered the speech. 

Step 5:  Practice your delivery out loud, standing up.  Add hand gestures and work to convey meaning through both verbal and non-verbal expression.  Memorize your introduction, the first two sentences, the last two sentences, and at least two other sentences where you would like to have sustained eye contact.

Day 1 of Speeches
(Three pairs of speakers will volunteer to perform and receive verbal feedback from the teacher for the good of the group.):
  The audience will write reactions in their notebooks after each speech. Reaction questions:

1. How did the speaker's delivery style enhance or detract from the conveyance of the speech's message?
2.  To what extent and in what specific ways did the writer appeal to ethos, logos, and pathos?
3. What aspects of the speaker's delivery style did you most admire? Could you emulate or apply that technique?
4. Analyze the logic, individual reasoning/ideas, and organization of the speech. What was the writer’s purpose? How effectively did the writer/speaker achieve that purpose?

Subsequent Speech Days: Audience focus (and written reaction) will include:


*Comparison / contrast reacting today. As you listen, consider ways the speech relies on similar or different rhetorical strategies to the speech you will present.
*Use of anecdote, fact, extended definition, or other strategies to engage the listener. How does the speech reach out to the listener? Are the strategies used effective?

*Identifying favorite parts of each speech, capturing the words and phrases and resonant ideas you most admire.

Online Sources: 

  1. “The History Place: Great Speeches Collection” LINK

  2. Famous Speeches by Women LINK

  3. “American Rhetoric LINK

  4. Nobel Prize Winners: Nobel Lectures LINK

TED Talks LINK

 

Google SPEECH Form Submission Links (be sure you submit into the proper hour - one submission per pair)

2nd Hour LINK

4th Hour LINK

5th Hour LINK

 

Speech Roster (LINK)